Scams quiz

Scams iconTake this quiz to see how well you can identify and avoid scams. Test your knowledge.

There are ten questions. Select an answer to receive feedback. Your score is calculated at the end. 

Clock Estimated time: 5 mins

dollars and centsYou receive an email from someone called Mary, in Nigeria. Her husband, a distant relative, has died and left you a large inheritance. Mary just needs help to pay the fees necessary to access the money and then you will get your share. Should you help Mary?

  • Yes, if you need to pay a fee to access a large inheritance, why wouldn't you? You send Mary $500 and give her your details
  • No, you delete the email and do nothing

You've just been scammed! This scam is called an advance-fee fraud where you are asked to pay large fees to access a reward. There is no reward and no way for you to get your money back. In addition, the scammer may use your personal details to steal your identity. 
 
For more information see other scams  and identity fraud.

Good decision. This scam is called an advance-fee fraud where you are asked to pay large fees to access a reward. There is no reward and no way for you to get your money back. In addition, the scammer may use your personal details to steal your identity.

For more information see other scams and identity fraud.

piggybanks stackedHow much money do Australians lose to scams and fraud every year?

  • About $50 million
  • About $800 million
  • About $1.4 billion

That's correct. According to an ABS survey in 2010-2011 Australians lost more than $1.4 billion to scams and personal fraud.

Make sure you protect yourself and your money, see scams for more information.

That's incorrect. According to an ABS survey in 2010-2011 Australians lost more than $1.4 billion to scams and personal fraud.

Make sure you protect yourself and your money, see scams for more information.

wallet in chainsHow should you protect yourself from identity theft?

  • Lock your letter box
  • Shred all bills and personal documents before throwing them out
  • Don't give out your personal, credit card or online account details over the phone unless you completely trust and can verify the source
  • All of the above

That's right.
 
See identity fraud for more ways to protect your identity.

Almost, but the correct answer is d) all of the above.

See identity fraud for more ways to protect your identity.

camelionHow many Australians are victims of personal fraud on average every year?

  • About 120, 000
  • About 1.2 million
  • About 2 million

That's right! An ABS survey in 2010 - 2011 estimates that 1.2 million Australians were victims of credit card fraud, identity theft or scams.
 
See identity fraud and credit card scams for ways to protect yourself.

Not quite. An ABS survey in 2010 - 2011 estimates that 1.2 million Australians were victims of credit card fraud, identity theft or scams.

See identity fraud and credit card scams for ways to protect yourself.

MousepadYou receive an email from your bank saying there is a problem with your account. The email asks you to click on a link and verify your details. What do you do?

  • You delete the email and alert your bank
  • You click through, follow the prompts and enter your account details
  • You click on the link but don't enter your details.

Well done. This is actually a phishing scam, where someone pretends to be from your bank in order to find out your account details. Banks never ask you to click from an email to access your account.

For more information see requests for your account information (phishing).

Be careful! You may be providing details to scammers. These types of scams are called 'phishing'. Even if you don't provide your details, the scammer may have installed spyware software to track what you do on your computer. If you receive one of these emails, delete it immediately and call your bank if you are concerned about your account. Banks never ask you to click from an email to access your account.

For more information see requests for your account information (phishing).

Alarm clockYou receive a phone call out of the blue from someone offering you 'the investment of a lifetime' that promises to double your money in 6 months. You ask if you can think about it but you're told there are limited opportunities and if you don't act now you will miss out. What should you do?

  • Invest $1,000 now and invest more once you see results
  • Invest $10,000 now because an opportunity like this is too good to miss
  • Refuse the offer because it sounds too good to be true

Good decision! Pressure to act immediately can be a sign of a scam. Before making any investment decision, you should research the investment opportunity and make sure the person offering the investment is covered by an Australian Financial Services Licence (AFSL).

See investment scams and check an investment company or scheme for more information. 

Chances are you have just been scammed! This example shows some classic warning signs of an investment scam such as unbelievable returns and a need for you to act immediately.

See investment scams and check an investment company or scheme for more information.

mousetrapPete joined a dating website and met Jani online. They chatted online for a few weeks and got on really well. Jani told him she was from Yugoslavia and was from a wealthy family. Sadly she had been cut off from the family trust until she married. A few months later Jani told Pete she would like to meet him in person and asked to borrow $5,000 to pay for the airfare to Australia and other expenses. Should Pete send Jani the money?

  • Yes, Pete should send Jani the money
  • No, Pete should not send the money.

That's right. This example shows some classic signs of a dating scam. Always be suspicious when people you meet online ask you to send them money.

For more information see other scams.

Wrong! Jani sounds like a type of scammer who targets people on dating websites. Always be suspicious when people you meet online ask you to send them money.

For more information see other scams.

piggybank and hammerYour debts are getting out of control and you confide in a friend that you might have to sell your car to pay off your credit card. Your friend tells you about a guy he knows called Nick, who has been helping people access their superannuation early by rolling it into a self-managed super fund. Life would be much easier if you got rid of your debts. Should you contact Nick?

  • No, it's not a good idea to access your super early
  • Yes, you need the money, your retirement savings can wait

Don't do it! Nick is a scammer and is likely to take some or all of your super savings. Accessing your super before you reach preservation age is illegal, except in very limited circumstances, and you could face heavy legal and tax penalties.

See superannuation scams  for more information or trouble with debt if you're struggling to manage debts. 

That's right. This is a scam and it is likely that Nick would take some or all of your super savings. It is illegal to access your super before you reach preservation age, except in very limited circumstances, and you could face legal and tax penalties if you do.

See superannuation scams for more information or trouble with debt if you're struggling to manage debts. 

dice

You see an advertisement that says you can make a lot of money from sporting events. When you call, the salesperson explains they have software they can accurately predict the results of sporting events. It will cost you $6,000 to invest in the software but you could easily make $40,000 in a year with an initial bet of just $100. Should you invest?

  • Yes, you invest $6,000
  • No, you decline the offer.

Smart choice! This is not a financial investment. At best it's gambling and profits can not be guaranteed, at worst it's a scam.

For more information see sports betting software.

That's probably not a good idea. This is not a financial investment. At best it's gambling and profits can not be guaranteed, at worst it's a scam.

For more information see sports betting software.

man with magnifying glassWhat should you do when you receive your bank statement in the mail?

  • Check the balance
  • Check each transaction

That's right! You should check the transactions to make sure there aren't any transactions that you haven't authorised.

For more information see unauthorised transactions on your bank account and identity fraud.

No, you need to check more than the balance. You should also check the transactions to make sure there aren't any transactions that you haven't authorised.

For more information see unauthorised transactions on your bank account and identity fraud.


Last updated: 26 Jul 2016